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Azure Pipelines CI/CD TODO

Azure Pipelines documentation – Azure DevOps | Microsoft Docs

What is Azure Pipelines?

  • Azure Pipelines automatically builds and tests code projects to make them available to others.
  • Azure Pipelines combines continuous integration (CI) and continuous delivery (CD) to test and build your code and ship it to any target.
  • Continuous Integration (CI) is the practice used by development teams of automating merging and testing code.
  • Artifacts are produced from CI systems and fed to release processes to drive frequent deployments.
  • Continuous Delivery (CD) is a process by which code is built, tested, and deployed to one or more test and production environments.
  • Continuous Testing (CT) on-premises or in the cloud is the use of automated build-deploy-test workflows, with a choice of technologies and frameworks that test your changes continuously in a fast, scalable, and efficient manner.

Version control systems
The starting point for configuring CI and CD for your applications is to have your source code in a version control system. Azure DevOps supports two forms of version control – Git and Azure Repos.

Deployment targets
Use Azure Pipelines to deploy your code to multiple targets.
Once you have continuous integration in place, the next step is to create a release definition to automate the deployment of your application to one or more environments.

Continuous testing

What do I need to use Azure Pipelines?
Create or already have an organization in Azure DevOps.
Store your source code in a version control system

Azure DevOps Services
If you use public projects, Azure Pipelines is free

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/devops/organizations/public/about-public-projects?view=azure-devops

If you use private projects, you can run up to 1,800 minutes (30 hours) of pipeline jobs for free every month.

https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/pricing/details/devops/azure-devops-services/

Use Azure Pipelines

Use Azure Pipelines – Azure Pipelines | Microsoft Docs

Follow these basic steps:

  1. Configure Azure Pipelines to use your Git repo.
  2. Edit your azure-pipelines.yml file to define your build.
  3. Push your code to your version control repository. This action kicks off the default trigger to build and deploy and then monitor the results.

Your code is now updated, built, tested, and packaged. It can be deployed to any target.

Define pipelines using the Classic interface

Follow these basic steps:

  1. Configure Azure Pipelines to use your Git repo.
  2. Use the Azure Pipelines classic editor to create and configure your build and release pipelines.
  3. Push your code to your version control repository. This action triggers your pipeline and runs tasks such as building or testing code.

The build creates an artifact that’s used by the rest of your pipeline to run tasks such as deploying to staging or production.

Your code is now updated, built, tested, and packaged. It can be deployed to any target.

Yaml or Classic interface

Certain pipeline features are only available when using YAML or when defining build or release pipelines with the Classic interface

Most features are available in Yaml, less in Classic interface.

Create your first pipeline

Create your first pipeline – Azure Pipelines | Microsoft Docs

This guide uses YAML pipelines configured with the YAML pipeline editor.

We need:

  • A GitHub account where you can create a repository. Create one for free.
  • An Azure DevOps organization. Create one for free. If your team already has one, then make sure you’re an administrator of the Azure DevOps project that you want to use.

Sign up for Azure Pipelines – Azure Pipelines | Microsoft Docs

  • An ability to run pipelines on Microsoft-hosted agents. You can either purchase a parallel job or you can request a free tier.

Configure and pay for parallel jobs – Azure DevOps | Microsoft Docs

Maybe start with github actions for now.

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